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Malaysian and Chinese Cuisine

Our Specialties

Malaysian cuisine consists of cooking traditions and practices found in Malaysia, and reflects the multiethnic makeup of its population.The vast majority of Malaysia’s population can roughly be divided among three major ethnic groups: Malays, Chinese and Indians.

A popular dish based on rice in Malaysia is nasi lemak, rice steamed with coconut milk and pandan leaves to give it a rich fragrance. Of Malay origin, nasi lemak is frequently referred to as the national dish.It is customarily served with ikan bilis, peanuts, sliced cucumber, hard boiled eggs and sambal. Although it is often considered a breakfast dish, because of the versatility of nasi lemak in being able to be served in a variety of ways, it is commonly eaten at any time of the day. For a more substantial meal, nasi lemak may be served with fried chicken, curries, or a spicy meat stew called rendang.

Malaysians will proudly declare that they have the best satay, and that others have just been more successful at marketing it. (Thailand and Indonesia, to name two, might contest that.) But you’ll see satay all over the place in Malaysia, towering piles of skewers in hawker stalls that are tossed on the grill once you order. Penang food writer Helen Ong distinguishes Malaysian satay by its peanut-based “sweet and slightly piquant sauce” and the “meats marinated with local spices.”

There are endless varations of laksa, Malaysia’s beloved noodle soup, but there are two umbrella categories: asam laksa and curry laksa. The former, pictured here, has a tart tamarind-based broth and is generally cooked with a flaky white fish; noodles on the bottom, cucumber and pineapple and the bitter torch ginger flower to top. It’s a little diferent everywhere you get it: in Penang, pictured here, it’s often particularly tart and spicy; the city’s proximity to Thailand is reflected in their perchant for those flavors.

Stir-fried noodles, which take many forms. You’ll often see yellow noodles quickly wok’d up with soy, garlic, shallots, and chilies; along with them might be shrimp or chicken, beef or vegetables. It’s fantastic street food; many hawkers use roaring charcoal fires, and their smoky flavor really makes anything cooked over it.

The food was great

Johnny

I was on business trip for one week in london. We was recomended by friend to have dinner at Lagenda Restaurant. The food we order is so delicious i didnt expect the taste is as close as the food back home! Service is great people they are friendly and very knowledgeable about the malaysian food. Next time i come to london i will definately come back Lagenda restaurant!

Mohd Rizuan
Malaysian food signature

Nasi Lemak

Nasi lemak could be considered Malaysia’s national dish—a little banana leaf parcel that cradles a bed of coconut rice with spicy sambal, crunchy dried anchovies (ikan bilis), roasted peanuts, cucumber, and egg (sometimes sliced of hard-boiled, sometimes cooked like a flat omelet). While considered classic comfort food, it’s a showcase of flavors and textures, from the delicate coconut to the brash belacan, the tender bite of rice and the salty crunch of anchovies. The simplest elements really matter here: rice that’s suffused with the flavor of coconut milk and sometimes further fragranced with pandan; sambal that’s bright-tasting and spicy but balanced. It’s often eaten as a breakfast food, but can be a snack at any time of the day, and to bulk it up, it might be served with a seafood or chicken curry, or vegetables, or beef rendang.

Noodles

Curry Laksa

The richer member of the laksa family, thanks to coconut. The rempah (spice paste) of turmeric and ginger and lemongrass, chilies and belacan, imparts flavor to the coconut milk broth; along with noodles, it’ll be topped with shrimp, tofu puffs (that soak up the rich broth), cucumber, fish balls, and eggs.

Signature Rendang

Beef Rendang

A slow-cooked dry curry deeply spiced with ginger and turmeric, kaffir lime and chilis. (You’ll find chicken, vegetable, and seafood rendang as well.) In Malaysian fashion, it fuses sweet, sour, and savory elements, the curry picking up a creamy richness from two forms of coconut and an elusive tang from asam keping, slices of a sour sun-dried fruit.

Malaysian and Chinese Cuisine

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